The future of watches?

The Casio CA53W-1 (C) Casio Many of you will no doubt recall the Casio and Pulsar databank watches from the 1980s. These “wrist computers” were large, bulky, plastic gadgets that stored (up to) 30 phone numbers, completed basic calculations and included multiple time zones, chronos, countdowns and associated alarms. In fact, everything the business (wo)man of the Eighties needed, but couldn’t…

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An honest watch…

A 17 Jewel Baylor Diver with AS movement Baylor was the in-house watch brand of the US jewellery giant Zales, and sold watches from the 60s through to the demise of Zales watch business in the 90s. As with many “private label” businesses, the watches were largely manufactured by Swiss companies, badged with the Baylor…

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Ulysse Nardin at Kronometry 1999

Ulysse Nardin is a watch manufacturer steeped in history; Kronometry 1999, a modern brand that showcases the best in horology. Together, last Thursday, they presented some of the most complicated and astounding watches seen in London this year. Among them, a platinum Moonstruck, the Trilogy of Time set (below), the three-handed Classico, the remarkable Freak Diavolo…

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An inordinate fondness for molluscs…

Perhaps it’s their multi-limbed nature, or perhaps it’s just because watch brands seem keen to borrow ideas from each other, but there really does appear to be an inordinate fondness for Cephalopod molluscs… Kenzo Nautilus Nautili: In the beginning, there was the Dreadnought, a German-built, English-designed dive watch from Time Factors. However, there was a crypto-cephalo version…

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A Very Canadian Dive Watch

Made for a 2009 Canadian Military contract, the Marathon “Maple Leaf” GSAR is a relatively rare version of the Government-issued Search and Rescue watch (hence GSAR) with a red appliqué Maple Leaf on the dial.  At a shade under 100g and approximately 46mm across, this watch is not unimpressive; it sports the ‘workhouse’ (but still highly…

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